Tag Archives: friendship

A review of Anne of Windy Poplars

Anne of Windy Poplars (Anne of Green Gables, #4)Anne of Windy Poplars by L.M. Montgomery
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This is the last-written Anne book, from 1936. Montgomery has gone back and filled in some missing time between Anne of the Island and Anne’s House of Dreams. Cynically, one imagines this either to be a money grab or a result of ongoing demand for Anne books despite Montgomery’s preference for writing other things. Anyway, the book is entertaining.

A lot of things happen. Anne seems to somehow be the confidante of a multitude of young women, each of whom tends to only appear for one episode in which something interesting, amusing, what-have-you occurs. This is not Avonlea, where there was at least consistency amongst Anne’s circle. Beyond the women with whom she lives and little Elizabeth, very few characters stay for more than one episode. Of those who do, Katherine Brooke is potentially the most interesting. Indeed, one could wish simply for her to have her own book with added depth of character rather than being one of many side interests in an Anne book.

There is no main plot, either — there is one arc that comes to a satisfactory closing less than a third of the way in, and then there are the subplots of little Elizabeth and Katherine Brooke.

Despite its plotlessness, this book is entertaining, which is what most people come to Anne books for. I enjoyed it, and I am not its main audience (I am a 36-year-old man with no daughters). Anne is the same as she ever was. There are many references to the Romantics as well as, of course, Romantic imaginings stepping through the prosaic via symbol into the beauty of mystery — high and mighty, one wishes to invoke Coleridge, but there is nothing so stark as The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Anne novels.

The most important theme tying together these many young women as well as the subplots of little Elizabeth and Katherine, not to mention the widows as well as the affection that binds Anne to Gilbert, is the power of friendship. Having a Friend can soften the hard exterior. Friendship can awaken the imagination to greater possibilities. These are themes worth anyone’s time, whether 12-year-old girls (whom I imagine to be the main Anne audience) or 36-year-old men.

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Personhood and Relationship (and Odo from Star Trek)

I’ve blogged on this topic once before, in relation to the character of Hu in Star Trek: The Next Generation. Hu, you will recall, was a Borg who became dislocated from the rest of the Borg Collective, and during his time on the USS Enterprise, became friends with Geordie Laforge. This friendship was the evidence necessary not simply of Hu’s emergence as an individual separate from the drone-state of the Borg, but of being a real person.

You see, we manifest our personhood not simply in our individuality (rocks are individual, my mobile phone is individual, the Wedgewood vase on my windowsill is individual) but in our relationships with others. True personhood, whether human, alien, or divine, is manifested most fully in relationship with others.

And in relationships of love — such as friendship — that personhood is actualised in a particular way that can bring out the best in us.

It turns out that this theme is not restricted to Hu. In Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Season 3, Episode 14, ‘Heart of Stone’, Odo and Major Kira are trapped in some caverns in a seismically unstable moon. In true Trek fashion, Kira is trapped in a crystal, and looks about to die, so she asks Odo to tell a story to keep her occupied.

Odo tells the story of how he got his name.

Odo, in case you don’t know it, is a changeling, a shapeshifter. He was discovered by a Bajoran scientist and raised in a lab. At first, they did not know what Odo was. All the specimens in the lab were labelled, and this one was given the label, ‘Odoital’, which was meant to represent that the specimen was unknown, but is actually the Cardassian word for ‘Nothing.’

Once it became clear that Odo was actually sentient, they still called him Odo, but broke it in two like a Bajoran name — Odo Ital. Whenever anyone called him by this name, Odo, he heard this nothing behind it. That that was all he was — nothing.

But not anymore. Not since meeting Kira. And the rest of the crew of the space station Deep Space 9. Now, when people call him ‘Odo’, it simply means himself.

Through friendship, through companionship, this lost, lonely alien, who until recently knew no other of his kind, became comfortable with his own person. Odo became a name to him; it meant himself.

This is what our relationships do to us. We are not discrete, atomised individuals, but persons interacting all the time, moving through one another in relationship. These relationships are what make us persons. We should probably cultivate good ones, I think.