About

IMG_2553Welcome to The Wordhoard (formerly Matthew’s Random Ramblings). I’m pleased you’ve found yourself here, and hope you enjoy your visit. I have two Master’s Degrees, one in Classics and one in Church History, and am currently pursuing a PhD in the overlap between the two fields as I examine Late Antique epistolography in the letters of Pope Leo the Great (pope 440-461) and their transmission through the Middle Ages. But there won’t be too much about Latin epistolography here. I think. (Who can say?)

Here you’ll find stuff about books, movies, poems, thoughts, life in Scotland, and what have you. Whatever crosses my mind. I am a Canadian living in Scotland with my wife, my Playmobil Vikings, a growing personal library, and a stamp collection.

I am most prone to blog about Classics, Mediaeval Stuff, and Science Fiction and Fantasy. My research involves travel, so I talk about the places I go as well. The header photo for this blog is a random image I took during my travels; in theory, refreshing the page will change the image. 😉

3 thoughts on “About

  1. Michael

    Hello Matthew,
    thank you for the information you provide us. I have one question for you. Do you know any Old English literary work where a magical ring is featured? I, too, searched in Beowulf and couldn’t find any. I assume, if there are any, they’d mostly be runic rings bearing the power of word and the ancient runes, rather the the stone-set ones as in the Middle English romances. If you can send me a source, I’d really appreciate your help; I only need one example.

    Thank you and have a nice start in the new week.
    Michael

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    1. MJH Post author

      Hi Michael! Thanks for your question. Sadly, none of the OE literature I’ve read features a magic ring. I wish such existed, though! I wonder where to start looking…

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    2. MJH Post author

      Update: Thomas Bulfinch’s Legends of Charlemagne features a magic ring. He doesn’t mention the source text for the ring, but it is probably High Mediaeval and definitely Continental.

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